I’m Just Here So I Don’t Get Fined

lynch28s-1-webI had some online discussions with folks yesterday about Marshawn Lynch, and how he repeatedly answered reporters at Super Bowl Media day with “I’m just here so I don’t get fined.”  I was saying that the NFL needs more Marshawn Lynch.

I received responses such as:

this guy is such a tool. When you join the NFL, you represent the NFL, which means your represent the Seahawks. People and kids look up to the players, their idols. And this guys is just an asshole, has been from day one. Great role model.

Let me get this straight:  Marshawn Lynch sacrifices his body 16 Sundays a year to generate money for the NFL and the Seattle Seahawks.  You know, the NFL, the organization that arbitrarily punishes players for off the field behavior, collectively bargains to make sure the players don’t get one more penny than they “deserve”, and repeatedly hid evidence of the long term effects of concussions.

Now somehow Lynch is the bad guy?

Personally, I think that Marshawn is a great role model.  I want my kids looking up to someone who sticks up for himself against an organization like the NFL in the middle of their circus that is the Super Bowl.  Honestly, how many ways does Marshawn have to make a statement that will mean something without losing his livelihood he’s worked so hard for?

Kudos to you, Marshawn.

Please just stop grabbing your crotch, ok?  That’s one thing I don’t want my kids to emulate.

How to Fix the National Football League

I used to LOVE watching NFL football.  I also enjoy college football, but the speed and precision of the pro game were leaps and bounds more entertaining for me.

The past year has exposed a lot of issues with the NFL.  I know that for at least myself, it’s gotten pretty frustrating to watch and follow the league, and I’ve started to giving up on them.

I’ve probably put more thought into this than I should, but I’d like to go through my list of suggestions on how I would fix the league.  Some of these will likely end up with blog posts of their own, but I wanted to summarize my overall thoughts.
If I were supreme leader of the National Football League, these are the initiatives I would institute immediately (in no particular order):
  • Full time officials
  • Permanent cameras trained on each end of the goal lines and all out of bounds lines
  • Lights on the line-of-scrimmage sticks that go off when the play clock or game clock goes to zero
  • A replay system where every play is watched by the replay official, just as in college.  The referee on the field would never go “under the hood”.
  • Replay review of penalties, particularly pass interference.
  • Stop the clock on first downs, at least in the final 2 minutes of the 2nd and 4th quarters.
  • Better control of the clock by the officials on the field, similar to what is used in the NBA and major conferences in NCAA basketball.
  • Fire Roger Goodell
  • Create more consistent rules governing player discipline for off the field actions.
I’ll elaborate on these points later with follow up posts going into more detail.
What do you think the NFL can do to improve the game?  Leave your suggestions in the comments!

Lamar Odom is Done as a Maverick

Per Mark Stein of ESPN:

Lamar Odom’s brief and bumpy ride with the Dallas Mavericks has come to an abrupt end.

The Mavericks and Odom spent Easter Sunday working out a parting, according to sources close to the situation, that frees the struggling Odom to leave the team immediately without actually being released.

“The Mavericks and I have mutually agreed that it’s in the best interest of both parties for me to step away from the team,” Odom said in a statement to ESPN.com. “I’m sorry that things didn’t work out better for both of us, but I wish the Mavs’ organization, my teammates and Dallas fans nothing but continued success in the defense of their championship.”

It’s been clear Odom is not a fit in Dallas, and the effort just hasn’t been there.  It’s disappointing, as I thought going into this season that things were going to hinge on the play of Odom.  Unfortunately, it has turned out to be true, and not in a good way.

Dallas Cowboys Losing Cap Space

The Dallas Cowboys are set to lose $10 million against the cap over the next two years, while the Redskins are set to lose $36 million.  According to ESPN:

During the pre-lockout 2010 season, the collective bargaining agreement expired and the league operated without a salary cap.

According to sources, the Cowboys and Redskins took immediate cap hits during the 2010 season that normally would have been spread out over the length of the contracts, giving them an advantage that other NFL owners found unfair.

Putting all biases aside, this is total B.S.  The Cowboys and Redskins both took advantage of the uncapped season and reworked contracts accordingly.  Now Goodell is punishing them retroactively for something they did that was not against the rules.

That being said, it makes me smile to see Dan Snyder get screwed out of $36 million in cap space right after he trades away draft picks that are more precious than ever after the latest CBA.

I’m Over Game 6

As I kept tabs Wednesday on the buzz surrounding the arrival of Baseball Easter (aka Pitchers and Catchers Report) for the Texas Rangers, I felt, as seemed to be common, a charge of excitement.  I’ve been looking for a good reason to start writing more in this space, and PACR gave me that impetus.  So, I’m going to resolve to try (operative word) to offer some sort of unique perspective on the Rangers on a regular basis.  I don’t know yet what niche I will be able to carve out (if any), how many people will read it (if any), or whether there’s even any need for my thoughts, since we are fortunate to have a slew of must-read Rangers material in this market already (see BBTiA, Lone Star Ball, Newberg Report, Scott Lucas).

Nonetheless…here goes. Continue reading

Abandon All Hope

In one brief statement after last Sunday’s season finale in the Meadowlands, Jerry Jones summed up the direction and organizational philosophy of the Dallas Cowboys in the way that only he can:

“The facts are that I’ve spent 22 years doing this exactly the same way,” Jones said Tuesday on KRLD-FM. “I’ve made a lot of changes from year to year as time goes along, but frankly, I know that when we do not have the kind of success, when we don’t have expectations lived up to, the one that should get the most heat is the one that ultimately makes the decisions, period, with the Dallas Cowboys. And that’s me.”

The contradictions in those remarks are obvious, yet the logic contained within is so full of twists and turns that it defies analysis. Find a new team to root for, people.